Oxford Protein Analysis Software Suite (OxPASS)

Analysis of complex protein structural parameters

The process of characterising complex biomolecules, such as proteins, requires the use of a range of different techniques. Versatile software solutions are needed to bring together the information gathered from different sources and extract the most relevant parameters. The Oxford Protein Analysis Software Suite (OxPASS) provides the means to collate data from Mass Spectrometry, NMR and X-Ray crystallography experiments with unprecedented speed and accuracy.

OxPASS consists of the following components:

IMPACT (10126) – An algorithm and software implementation to rapidly calculate the size (collisional cross section) of proteins with applications in structural biology and proteomics.

PULSAR (10597) – Proprietary software for the analysis of ion-mobility mass spectrometry data, including tools to quantify and compute gas-phase stabilisation of proteins.

UniDec (12116) – A Bayesian approach to provide rapid and reliable deconvolution of polydisperse and complex mass spectrometry and ion mobility-mass spectrometry spectra.

NMR Assignment (12970) – Software that enables automated assignment of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra for proteins, small molecules and intermolecular complexes of proteins and small molecules.

EM∩IM (13366) – Software capable of correlating electron microscopy and ion mobility experiments to rapidly calculate protein collision cross sections (CCSs).

BiobOx (13367) – Software for the analysis of protein structures from the atomic level up to multimeric quaternary structures.

DynamXL (14605) – Software that can precisely model cross-links between amino acids in a protein by accounting for the dynamics of the linker and amino acid side chains.

Licencing

The OxPASS package is available free for academic use. Commercial licences are also available to all or parts of the package upon enquiry.

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