Companies formed

Since 1997, Oxford University Innovation has been responsible for creating spinout companies based on academic research generated within and owned by the University of Oxford, and has spun out a new company every two months on average.

Over £266 million in external investment has been raised by Oxford University Innovation spinouts since 2000, and five are currently listed on London’s AIM market.

The creation of these new spinout companies also channels millions of pounds back into University research, benefits local economic development and has created many new jobs in the region.

2016

DiffBlue is a world leader in automated test generation. Their products have been developed with industry partners over the last ten years and replace the manual process of writing tests.

Incorporated in March 2016

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Computer Science

Contact: James Mallinson

The company has been formed around two viral vector vaccines, one to prevent influenza and the other to treat prostate cancer.

Incorporated in March 2016

Origin: Oxford University, Jenner Institute

Contact: James Mallinson

Specialise in applying state-of-the-art mass spectrometry platforms to characterising intact protein assemblies, often referred to as native mass spectrometry.

Incorporated in March 2016

Origin: Oxford University, Chemistry

Contact: James Mallinson

A software that uses advanced algorithms and techniques to solve problems

Incorporated in February 2016

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Engineering Science

Contact: James Mallinson

Data discovery software to manage and sort collections of images and data visually

Incorporated in January 2016

Origin: Oxford University, Sir William Dunn School of Pathology

Contact: James Mallinson

2015

Developing tiny metallic mesh tube devices to treat patients suffering from brain aneurysms

Incorporated in December 2015

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Engineering Science

Contact: James Mallinson

A revolutionary new approach to indoor positioning that combines data from mobile phone sensors with map information such as floor plans, and wifi “maps” where available, to give highly accurate location information without the need for any further hardware.

Incorporated in December 2015

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Computer Science

Contact: James Mallinson

Using phase change materials for smart glazing and displays.

Incorporated in November 2015

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Materials

Contact: James Mallinson

The OxEML system uses electromagnetic and acoustic waves to create a new class of medical images at a cost comparable to ultrasound.

Incorporated in October 2015

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Engineering Science

Contact: James Mallinson

Oxford Flow’s industrial pressure regulators use innovative technology to provide new levels of performance for natural gas transmission, water distribution and process industries.

Incorporated in September 2015

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Engineering Science

Contact: James Mallinson

Deontics is software which guides doctors and patients through the scientific and clinical decision making.

Incorporated in August 2015

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Engineering Science

Contact: James Mallinson

Developing a novel cancer immunotherapy discovered through a collaboration between Ludwig Cancer Research and Professor Vincenzo Cerundolo, the director of the MRC Human Immunology Unit within the University of Oxford’s Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine.

Incorporated in July 2015

Origin: Oxford University, Radcliffe Department of Medicine

Contact: Carolyn Porter

Developing domestic energy storage capacity and facilitating its operation within the existing power distribution infrastructure.

Incorporated in April 2015

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Engineering Science

Contact: James Mallinson

AnDy marries fine-engineering skills with a deep understanding of the fundamental mechanisms, to produce revolutionary machines that will change the shape of the future, taking inspiration from our environment in order to protect it, and capable of performance beyond anything currently found in nature or engineering.

Incorporated in April 2015

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Zoology

Contact: James Mallinson

Domain-centric intelligent automated data extraction methodology.

Incorporated in February 2015

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Computer Science

Contact: James Mallinson

2014

At OxSyBio, we are developing 3D printing techniques to produce a range of tissue-like and functional tissues for medical research and clinical applications. Our vision is to ultimately produce tissues that can be used in the clinic for organ repair or replacement.

Professor Bayley’s group have previously demonstrated the ability to print three-dimensional networks comprising tens of thousands of picoliter aqueous droplets forming a cohesive material. These networks can be built in software-controlled geometries using a number of different droplet types, thus enabling them to perform simple cell-like functions and act as ‘tissue-like’ materials. Initial work showed that printed networks were capable of conducting electrical signals along neuron-like pathways by the selective incorporation of membrane proteins, or to fold in a pre-defined manner to assume altered shapes after printing.

OxSyBio is refining and advancing this technology to print more complex networks more rapidly and at a higher resolution. We are also adapting the approach to print living cells inside droplets, which will enable the direct printing of 3D cell networks with many of the characteristics of living tissues.

Incorporated in April 2014

Origin: Oxford University, Department of Chemistry

Contact: James Mallinson

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