Health and Self-Management in Diabetes (HASMID-10)

HASMID-10 is a short questionnaire that contains ten items each with four response levels to measure the impact of self-management in diabetes for both Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes.

Background

The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing dramatically, placing considerable financial burden on the healthcare budget of each country. Patient self-management is crucial for the control of blood glucose, which largely determines the chances of developing diabetes-related complications. Self-management interventions vary widely, and a method is required for assessing the impact of self-management. This paper describes the development of a questionnaire intended for use to measure the impact of self-management in diabetes.

 

HASMID-10 is a short questionnaire that contains ten items each with four response levels to measure the impact of self-management in diabetes for both Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes.

The measure was developed using a mixed-methods approach that involved semi-structured interviews with people with diabetes. The measure has high face validity. Ongoing research is being undertaken to assess the validity of this questionnaire for measuring the impact of self-management interventions in economic evaluation (HRQoL).

Development

The HASMID-10 identifies Eight management attributes. The three attributes from the DHP and energy for the attributes designed to capture HRQoL, and the four attributes identified from the patient interviews cover self-management, resulting in the following eight attributes for inclusion in the questionnaire.

1.Mood

2.Hypoglycaemic attacks

3.Social Limitations

4.Energy

5.Control

6.Hassle

7.Stress

8.Support

Four of these self-management attributes (Control, Hassle, Stress + Support) were selected with four health attributes; mood, fear about hypos (hypoglycaemic episodes), energy and social limitations.

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Advantages

The HASMID-10 questionnaire is a short, easy-to-complete PROM. It has been developed following a series of rigorous iterations, with high involvement of patients and service-users to ensure good face validity.

  • Appears to perform better than EQ-5D-5
  • Ability to differentiate between treatment groups
  • Can be scored using total summative scores
  • Utility and monetary values are available
  • Can be used in a range of applications including cost-utility and cost-benefit analysis

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