The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (OxPAQ) – Further validation for use in three more conditions

21st June 2019

The generic Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) measure – the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (OxPAQ) has been further validated for use in three more common conditions.

The generic Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) measure – the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (OxPAQ) has been further validated for use in three more common conditions. Further work by the OxPAQ development team at the University of Oxford, has resulted in the populations that the OxPAQ is validated for being extended to include:

  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
  • Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage (SAH)
  • Valvular heart disease.

This adds to the existing populations that the OxPAQ is validated for, namely, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease. Further work is ongoing to validate the measure for five other common conditions.

 

Further information on the OxPAQ:

The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (OxPAQ) is a short, 23-item, patient-reported outcome measure developed to assess participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and is fully compliant with current best practice guidelines, such as those published by the FDA. The Ox-PAQ was developed by researchers within the Health Services Research Unit, part of the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford. The Ox-PAQ also comes as an ‘acute’ version, with emphasis on the recall period being more recent; 1 week rather than 4 weeks.

The development of the OxPAQ was funded by the European Brain Council.

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